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Explore the best Indigenous art of 2016

Be inspired by the 2016 winners

See all the 2016 Telstra NATSIAA winners and finalists from across Australia below.

The Telstra National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Awards showcases the quality and diversity of Indigenous art from regional and urban areas throughout Australia. 

We are pleased to share with you the 2016 Telstra NATSIAA winners and finalists. 

2016 Winners

Harold Joseph Thomas

Harold Joseph Thomas

 

WINNER of the Telstra Art Award

Artwork: Tribal Abduction

The overall winner of the 2016 Telstra NATSIAA. The judging panel said that “the potency of the subject matter coupled with Thomas’ practiced hand and classical composition make the work a compelling choice this year.

Betty Kuntiwa Pumani

Betty Kuntiwa
Pumani

WINNER of the Telstra General Painting Award

Artwork: Antara

The story behind this artwork is two women went to the top of a hill near Antara. They were singing songs and hitting the rock with a stick to bring enough witchetty grubs for everyone. Afterwards, there was the biggest mob of witchetty grubs

John Mawurdjul

John Mawurdjul

WINNER of Telstra Bark Painting Award

Artwork: Dilebang

The white arch depicted in the work is a rock inside the waterhole, the bone of a Serpent and a rainbow across the sky.

Nicole Monks

Nicole Monks

WINNER of the Wandjuk Marika Memorial 3D Award (sponsored by Telstra)

Artwork: We Are All Animals

This work has incorporated various processes, including the painted background, photographic self portrait and use of graphics, to produce a strong statement about cultural identity. The work directly talks about racism and the politics of 'blood'.

Robert Pau

Robert Pau

WINNER of the Telstra Work on Paper Award

Artwork: Battle of Bikar

Battle of Bikar is from the series "Black wars of Torres Strait," Pau says "the battles that occurred in the Torres Strait were not meaningless merciless killings, they were primary based on protection of territory and resources."

Ishmael Marika

Ishmael Marika

WINNER of the Telstra Youth Award

Artwork: Sunlight energy II

In October 2015 Marika travelled with other Indigenous artists to Lake Mungo and camped near the old people’s camp. Marika felt the energy of the sunlight.


2016 Finalists

alec baker

Alec Baker
Artwork: Ngura (Country)
Medium: Ink on Hahnemuhle paper 
About the work: Baker’s detailed works reflect topographic maps, using traditional dotting techniques and a tactile palette to highlight and define forms and spaces within the landscape. There is a strong sense of place within Baker’s drawings, as pathways and songlines entangle, his intrinsic landscape works harness a rhythm and bold resolve.

Andrew Snelgar

Andrew Snelgar
Artwork: Pulakarr Kaa-Kaa (Two Brothers)
Medium: Carved wood
About the work: A long way back in the Ngurrampa (Dreamtime) there lived two brothers,who were powerful. They were jealous of each other’s power, and wanted it as well as their own, to become all powerful. They were so greedy, they fought! They killed each other – and turned into stone.

Anwar Young

Anwar Young
Artwork: Kulata Tjuta Warmala (Army of many spears)
Medium: Wood, resin, kangaroo sinew, synthetic polymer paint
About the work: Young has made an army of kulata (spears). The spears represent the young men in the Amata community who continue to learn the traditions of Anangu (Aboriginal) men.

Baluka Maymuru

Baluka Maymuru
Artwork: Shipwrecked Soul
Medium: Natural earth pigments on wood
About the work: This work commemorates and liberates the spirit of an unknown non-Indigenous person who died on Maymaru's land after surviving the shipwreck of their boat.

Barayuwa Munungurr

Barayuwa Munungurr
Artwork: Ngaraka (Bones of the whale)
Medium: Ironwood
About the work: These are bones of the whale Mirinyungu. At Yarrinya, where this whale died, its bones are still present within the landscape of dangerous reefs just offshore.

Barbara Mbitjana Moore

Barbara Mbitjana Moore
Artwork: Ngayuku Ngura (My Country)
Medium: Synthetic polymer paint on linen
About the work: In this painting Moore has depicted her Country. The different colours and designs represent variations in the landscape. Some of the landmarks she paints are rock holes in and around her Country that are depicted as circles and concentric circles. She also depicts puli (mountains and rocks).

Beryl Jimmy

Beryl Jimmy
Artwork: Nyangatta Watarru
Medium: Synthetic polymer paint on linen
About the work: Nyangatja Watarru (this is a place called Watarru). Watarru is my home. This is Anangu tjuta (many people). nangu tjuta are moving around, moving between waterholes and creeks and looking for food.

Beyula Putungka Napanangka

Beyula Putungka Napanangka
Artwork: Kalinykalinypa Tjunkurrpa (Honey Grevillea Dreaming)
Medium: Synthetic polymer paint on linen
About the work: This painting tells the story of the Kalinykalinypa (desert grevillea flower), a favourite bush food for Anangu (Aboriginal) people. Its sweet nectar is sucked from the flower or collected and mixed with water to produce a type of cordial.

Brendan Kennedy

Brendan Kennedy
Artwork: Wangilatha Bapurra Thangurra
Medium: Synthetic polymer paint on canvas
About the work: I started creating art from a young age but I wasn’t conscious about what and how I was expressing my cultural connection to ancestors, time, place and country. As I have grown in age and experience, my own creativity has emerged and developed culturally and spiritually. It will continue to grow.

David Frank

David Frank
Artwork: Kulata Tjuta
Medium: Synthetic polymer paint on canvas
About the work: Last year the Wati’s (men) from the APY Lands did a big project with Kulata Tjuta. We made lots of spears, and did an Inma (ceremony), everyone together. We made a big performance on the lawns of Government House in Adelaide at TARNANTHI. I was remembering this time, how great our people and culture is.

Eunice Napanangka

Eunice Napanangka Jack
Artwork: Kuru Yultu
Medium: Synthetic polymer paint on linen
About the work: In this painting Jack depicts her father’s Tjukurpa (Dreaming). It shows a kulata (spear) that he threw and the nulla nulla (hunting stick) near Tjukurla in Western Australia. He was hitting the floor with the nulla nulla and by doing that, created a waterhole.

Eunice Porter

Eunice Porter
Artwork: Night Time Concert at Warakurna
Medium: Synthetic polymer paint on canvas
About the work: Porter depicts the joy and fun of a concert held in Warakurna one starry evening. Her free-flowing brush strokes and attention to detail have captured the mood of the evening, the coming together of the people in Warakurna, not to mention the locals letting loose on the dance floor.

Georgia MacGuire

Georgia MacGuire
Artwork: Ill-Fitted Uniform11
Medium: Paper, bark, cotton, lace, plaster bandage
About the work: Ill-fitted uniform II reflects upon the history of the assimilation of Aboriginal women and their subjection to a Western imposition of identity. The work examines the imposition of the white male gaze on Aboriginal women throughout their lives.

Glen (Kei Kalak) Mackie

Glen (Kei Kalak) Mackie
Artwork: Greedy Mokan
Medium: Vinyl cut relief print with watercolour
About the work: Mokan is a Kulgagal tale of a certain rock near a central spring on Yam (Iama) Island, formed when its owner was shot and crawled out of the spring he cherished. A greedy loner, the size of a dugong, Mokan is also the name given to the puffer fish.

Graham Badari

Graham Badari
Artwork: Lambalk dja Djebuyh (Sugar Gliders and Possums)
Medium: Natural earth pigments on bark
About the work: Badari has depicted two of Western Arnhem Land’s marsupials, the Lambalk (sugar glider) and Djebuyh (ringtail possum). Both animals are shown flying from tree to tree, climbing and hanging by their tail, spoiling themselves on the flowers and nectars of the Woollybutt Eucalyptus tree..

Gunybi Ganambarr

Gunybi Ganambarr
Artwork: Milngurr
Medium: Steel
About the work: This work is made from the remnants of an old metal tank at Gangan homeland. It depicts a dilly bag hanging on the Banyan tree left by the two Djang’kawu sisters at Gudalmirri, the place depicted in the design. This is freshwater Dhuwa Ngaymil clan Country belonging to Ganambarr’s Ngaymil clan.

Guykuda Mununggurr

Guykuda Mununggurr
Artwork: Merman
Medium: Natural earth pigments on wood, shells, shark vertebra, bark
About the work: This work depicts a merman which is completely the product of the artist’s imagination and bears no connection to Yolngu Law or culture. When asked about the underlying meaning he denied any. He said “It’s just art.” The merman is sitting atop a blue ring octopus which is sitting on a rock.

Isaac Cherel

Isaac Cherel
Artwork: Rabbits
Medium: Synthetic polymer paint on plywood
About the work: This painting is about the rabbits and centipedes living in holes on that flat country, on Gooniyandi country. Or, says Isaac now, its Mamu! That tall bugger, Yawoonkatji (sorcerer), who lives in the cave by the spring on Fossil Downs station - he’s looking for women, he likes the soft ones.

Jack Green

Jack Green
Artwork: Garrwa
Medium: Synthetic polymer paint on canvas
About the work: Outsiders are still trying to push us off our Country, this time through open-cut mining and fracking. It’s not just us blackfellas that are worried, but whitefellas too. We all gotta be lined-up together to protect our Country. Government and mining companies, they all in this together. They just like the one-eyed fella who’s got one eye on the money.

James Tylor

James Tylor
Artwork: Unwritten Race - The descent of man: 1. Aborigines Maories, 2. Australia half-caste, 3. Australian, 4. Chapter 7 EXTINCTION OF RACES, 5. England the Pacific Australia, 6. Mr Tylor's, 7. other dark races
Medium: 7 works, Ink on book page
About the work: Unwritten Race rewrites Charles Darwin’s chapter ‘On the Races of Man’. Using my own hybrid drawing design that combines iconography from my Nunga, Mãori, Norsk and British Australian heritage, I have attempted to write over Darwin’s theory of racial hybridity using my design as a more accurate representation of my multi-racial identity.

Janine McAullay Bott

Janine McAullay Bott
Artwork: Boundries,Respect, Consequences
Medium: Palm fronds, gumnuts, wood, synthetic polymer paint
About the work: The native land snail (Glauert’s Land Snail) is found in the southern areas of Western Australia which is my ancestral Country. The rabbit was introduced in Australia with the First Fleet in 1788. Damage and disease caused by the rabbits was so great that a fence was built from the Kimberley through to the southern coast east of Bremer Bay - my great grandmother Emily Coyne’s Country.

Jennifer Herd

Jennifer Herd
Artwork: In Defence-Shields of the North
Medium: Paper
About the work: The series of works “In Defence” pays tribute to the Bama warriors of the rainforests of North Queensland, my ancestral Country. This series of pinhole drawings are presented as a stark reminder of truth, frontier resistance and the aftermath of cultural identity stripped bare.

Kathleen Injiki Tjapalyi

Kathleen Injiki Tjapalyi
Artwork: Antara
Medium: Ink and acrylic on cotton rag paper
About the work: Antara is a sacred place for Anangu (Aboriginal people). It holds many Tjukurpa (songlines) stories that cross this land. It has a very important rockhole too. My painting depicts this special place.

Kaylene Whiskey

Kaylene Whiskey
Artwork: Kunpu Anangu Tjuta [Many Strong People]
Medium: Synthetic polymer paint on canvas
About the work: These are some of my favourite superheroes. Michael Jackson is watching country holding his kulata (spear), Tina Turner is watering her minkulpa pot plant – it’s getting big! Wonder Woman is catching malu (red kangaroo) and Rhianna is dreaming about ngintaka (giant lizard spirit).

Kent Morris

Kent Morris
Artwork: Cultural Reflections-Always on Country#7
Medium: Archival print on Canson rag photographique paper
About the work: The rhythms, shapes and designs of our ancestors are ever-present and form the first layer of many that have been overlaid. I am reconstructing the shapes and structures of the urban environment to reflect this. Our culture adapts to change but keeps continuous links to our ancestors. We are always on Country.

Kieren Karritpul

Kieren Karritpul
Artwork: Amembirr- child spirit
Medium: Synthetic polymer paint on linen
About the work: Amembirr tells a story about the child spirit, that elders in the community talk about. This is a spiritual belief that we have a connection with animals. My mother’s child spirit is the rainbow. When I go out on hunting trips and see the rain and the rainbow I know I am safe because my mum is with me.

Lena Yarinkura

Lena Yarinkura
Artwork: Sacred Waterholes
Medium: Fibre, feathers, wood, pandanus, natural earth pigments
About the work: There were two sisters out hunting lizards with their dog when they found Brolga eggs. They started cooking when a quoll approached them. One of the sisters wanted to keep the quoll but the other sister warned that it was dangerous and would bring trouble. Then Ngalyod, the Rainbow Serpent, crashed down into the earth, making a billabong and drowning the two sisters.

Lenie Namatjira

Lenie Namatjira
Artwork: West MacDonnell Ranges, Mt Sonder, woman lying down
Medium: Etching on paper
About the work: Arkutja (woman lying). This is a story in the Dreamtime. This is a story for men. I initially drew this picture on paper and then I drew straight onto a zinc plate to make an etching. I created this artwork during a professional development exchange with artists and students at the ANU School of Art in Canberra.

Lisa Waup

Lisa Waup
Artwork: Culture Basket
Medium: Feathers, bones, stone, cotton
About the work: My culture basket is inspired by spirit or poison bags from Papua New Guinea and symbolises justice, a system of tribal law, healing, peace and connection defining time and place. Being part of a lost Australian Indigenous generation and married to a Papua New Guinean man this new contemporary work is a bridge and a pathway to my roots.

Louise Daniels

Louise Daniels
Artwork: Melaleuca (Diptych)
Medium: Synthetic polymer paint on canvas
About the work: Melaleucas at the Mersey Bluff opposite Tiagarra Keeping Place, a very special place for us local Palawa people. The Old People used Melaleuca for many purposes. For me they represent my Country and connect me with the Old Ones.

Maath Maralngurra

Maath Maralngurra
Artwork: Ngalyod - The Rainbow Serpent
Medium: Natural earth pigments and watercolour on paper
About the work: Maralngurra depicts an important djang (ancestral creation) site near Kabulwarnamyo in Arnhemland. The site is part of a larger creation story known as Mankung Djang (Sugar bag dreaming). Maralngurra has illustrated Ngalyod (Rainbow Serpent) who lives deep within a nearby billabong which is abundant with Mandem (water lilies) that grow on the serpent’s back.

Margaret Poulsen

Margaret Poulsen
Artwork: Utju artist-self portrait
Medium: Gouache on paper
About the work: I am an artist, a painter. This is a portrait of me. I am looking out. The scarf. This is me, and the way I make paintings.

Matjangka Nyukana Norris

Matjangka Nyukana Norris
Artwork: Ngayuku Ngura
Medium: Synthetic polymer paint on linen
About the work: Highly expressive in her mark making, the country of the APY Lands is Norris’ inspiration. The puli (hills and ranges) within the Musgrave Ranges, north of Ernabella, are depicted in this painting alongside flat, grassy plains.

Melanie Evans

Melanie Evans
Artwork: Strength to all women
Medium: Silkscreen and found objects on silk
About the work: This piece was created to evoke strength for me and for all women, as we need to rise up to the many challenges that it provides for us to learn and grow from. The Seven Sisters and Emu dreaming stories and lore are significant to many Aboriginal women’s cultural knowledge throughout Australia and provide guidance and healing that I am only beginning to understand.

Mumu Mike Williams

Mumu Mike Williams
Artwork: Ngura (country)
Medium: Ink and tea on paper with Kulata frame: punu (wood), malu pulyku (kangaroo tendon) and kiti (resin made from spinifex grass)
About the work: This land belongs to all of the tjilpis and pampas (old men and women). Our parents and grandparents handed it down to us and we’ll hand it down to malatja malatja (future generations). It’s our ngura (land), our manta milmilpa (sacred sites), our Tjukurpa (culture, stories, heritage).

Muntaji Brumby

Muntaji Brumby
Artwork: Utju artist - Self portrait
Medium: Gouache on paper
About the work: This is a painting of me. I am walking along with my walker. It is what I need. It is part of me.

Naomi Hobson

Naomi Hobson
Artwork: Wathada
Medium: Synthetic polymer paint on canvas
About the work: This painting represents vastness, space, and powerful physical features. The isolated shapes are defined as the striking Birthday Mountains, a stand-alone mountain range that connects open space and provides cultural and physical reference to all the lands around it. The Birthday Mountains identify who we are.

Natalie Puantulura

Natalie Puantulura
Artwork: Jilamara Design
Medium: Natural earth pigments on linen
About the work: The dots represent the people coming together for ceremonies. Both men and women have joined as one in ceremony, like the one for Kulama (yam ceremony). My painting represents Pwangari Malipinyini Jilamara (design of dots and stripes), like we use in our ceremonies. These significant artistic designs collectively are called Jilamara.

Ngarralja Tommy May

Ngarralja Tommy May
Artwork: Raining on Kurtal
Medium: Etched enamel on tin
About the work: Kurtal is the Kalpurtu (Rainbow Serpent) that brings the rain. He is extremely powerful, not just anyone can talk to him. There is an important Junba (ceremony) that happens for him. He’ll come out, then he’ll bring the storm and it will rain.

Nici Cumpston

Nici Cumpston
Artwork: Mulyawong 11
Medium: Inkjet and Stabilo crayons on cotton rag
About the work: I was compelled to photograph the Xanthorrhoea (grass trees) yet the whole time I was there I felt a strong sense of unease, as if being watched. I liken the image to the story of the Mulyawongk, a Ngarrindjeri word for the bunyip, a monster that lives in the river. As a child growing up along the Darling and the Murray Rivers I was taught not to go to the river alone or the Mulyawongk would get me.

Nyapanyapa Yunupingu

Nyapanyapa Yunupingu
Artwork: Djomula at Dhanaya
Medium: Natural earth pigments on bark
About the work: This is a painting of the Djomula trees at Yunupingu’s coastal homeland of Dhanaya within Port Bradshaw. These are known in English as Whistling Trees, She-Oak or Casuarina and in Yolngu Matha as Mawurraki, Gaywangi or Warrapangi.

Penny Evans

Penny Evans
Artwork: Trophy Wife
Medium: Earthenware ceramic, echidna quills
About the work: Trophy wife symbolises the bravery of our black women taken forcibly on our colonial frontiers and their subsequent domestic slavery. The echidna quill is culturally protective of her spirit. She has been made with clay pressed into a plaster mould that was produced from a retro style plastic ‘Aboriginalia’ face..

Pepai Jangala Carroll

Pepai Jangala Carroll
Artwork: Walungurru
Medium: Stoneware
About the work: Carroll’s father comes from a place called Ininti. It is sand-dune country near Kintore (Walungurru) in the Northern Territory. The story depicted in this work is about a Wanampi, a water snake, that travelled from the sea towards Kintore. He was looking for a man, a troublemaker.

Peter Waples-Crowe

Peter Waples-Crowe
Artwork: Dingo in the bush
Medium: Giclee print on textured art paper
About the work: My kin. Are you an alpine dingo? Ngarigo? An unprotected native, second class. Misunderstood but so important to Country. They hunt you, abuse you, string you up like strange fruit. You pesky thing, in the way of PROGRESS. Are you queer? Shapeshifter. Dingo in the bush are you me? Am I you?

Rachael Mipantjiti Lionel

Rachael Mipantjiti Lionel
Artwork: Kapi Wankanya
Medium: Synthetic polymer paint on linen
About the work: Lionel is inspired by the stories and messages she receives through her dreams. Kapi Wankanya is a powerful water story. It is a story of living water. Lionel speaks of the sensation of floating in water and feeling its healing force inside her body.

Ray James Tjangala

Ray James Tjangala
Artwork: Tingari Men at Yunala
Medium: Synthetic polymer paint on linen
About the work: This painting relates to the soakage water site of Yunala, west of the Kiwirrkura community in Western Australia. In ancestral times a large group of Tingari men camped at this site before continuing their travels further east to Pinari, north-west of the Kintore Community.

Regina Pilawuk Wilson

Regina Pilawuk Wilson
Artwork: Syaw (Fish-net)
Medium: Synthetic polymer paint on linen
About the work: This painting depicts a Syaw (Fish-net), traditionally woven with pinbin (bush vine) by the women and men of Peppimenarti to capture fish and crayfish from fresh water creeks and rivers.

Ryan Presley

Ryan Presley
Artwork: Warheads
Medium: Linocut on paper
About the work: Warheads depicts three life-size saltwater crocodile skulls stacked vertically. Their mouths are open and coins flow freely from within their jaws. Each skull has a slightly different algebraic formula painted on its snout. This work is a deliberation on warfare, dominion and suppression in Australian society.

Seymour Wulida

Seymour Wulida
Artwork: Buluwana at Dilebang
Medium: Earth pigments on bark
About the work: That Buluwana is inside, she is in the water(hole). She sings out ‘aaaghh’ from the water, sometimes we can hear her. She can sing out to the Wak (a rock further south at Kurrurdal sacred to the crow) from Dilebang (the sacred waterhole), the water is big and black at my place.

Shirley Macnamara

Shirley Macnamara
Artwork: Ungabutha Guutu [Porcupine Vessel]
Medium: Spinifex, porcupine quills, fixative
About the work: When gathering spinifex on my country, I often see where porcupine have been. My home in far north-west Queensland is always extremely dry, so the co-existence of plants and animals amazes me. My grandmother often told me about hunting for porcupine, but the kids now call them echidna.

Shirley Purdie

Shirley Purdie
Artwork: Gilbany, On Garlungkudi and Mistake creek - all Massacre places (triptych)
Medium: Natural pigments on canvas
About the work: This work comprises 3 pieces.

Simon Hogan

Simon Hogan
Artwork: Lingka
Medium: Synthetic polymer paint on linen
About the work: This is Lingka a major rockhole in my Country. It’s an important sacred place. The trees signify that Tjukurpa (a spiritual presence) is here. This is all my Country..

Spinifex Men's Collaborative

Spinifex Men's Collaborative Artists: Ian Rictor, Lawrence Pennington, Ned Grant, Simon Hogan, Roy Underwood.
Artwork: Pukara
Medium: Synthetic polymer paint on linen
About the work: The Wati Kutjara Tjukurpa is a major creation line that traverses traditional Spinifex country after originating at Pukara, a site located in the northern part of Spinifex Lands. It follows two Wanampi (Water Serpents), a father and son as they head south for traditional ceremony.

Steaphan Paton

Steaphan Paton
Artwork: Cloaked combat#31
Medium: Giclee print on Hahnemule paper
About the work: Cloaked combat #31 explores the technological disparity between colonial conflict and the ongoing contemporary cloaked attacks on Aboriginal cultures and concepts of nationhood.

Stewart Hoosan

Stewart Hoosan
Artwork: Yarriyarri: Long George
Medium: Synthetic polymer paint on canvas
About the work: Yarriyarri or ‘Long George’ was a Garrwa Traditional Owner of the Calvert Hills area in the Gulf of Carpentaria. Long George wanted to drive the owner of Calvert Hills Station, Joe Clark, off his country while Joe wanted retribution for the cattle George had killed to feed his family. One day, to give Joe a fright, George speared him through his hat.

Ted Laxton (Pitcha Makin Fellas)

Ted Laxton (Pitcha Makin Fellas)
Artwork: British Bulldog
Medium: Synthetic polymer paint on foam board
About the work: Our lands and culture were taken away, small pieces given back, now and then, in someone else’s time on their terms. That ‘benevolent’ behaviour is as sincere and meaningful as a boomerang flying home on its circular path being intercepted and then returned to the owner. Beware of the dog.

Teresa Baker and Clarise Tunkin

Teresa Baker and Clarise Tunkin
Artwork: Minyma Malilunya
Medium: Synthetic polymer paint on linen
About the work: This is the Country for Malilu. She is a Creation being from the Tjukurpa (Dreamtime).

Tiger Yaltangki

Tiger Yaltangki
Artwork: Malpa Wiru (Good Friends)
Medium: Synthetic polymer paint on canvas
About the work: Yaltangki’s paintings are boldly coloured and often include elements of fantasy, reflecting both his creative talent and sense of humour. Malpa Wiru relates to imaginary and real friends that fill his paintings and creates a narrative in the medium of paint.

Tjanpi Desert Weavers

Tjanpi Desert Weavers
Artwork: Minyma Tjirilyanya ngaltutjara pikatjara (Porcupine Woman hurt and sick)
Medium: grass raffia, feathers, metal,acrylic, wool
About the work: This is the ancient Tjukurpa (Dreamtime) story of the Porcupine woman put into a contemporary context. The artists convey themes including; coping, caring for the sick, being rescued against all odds and surviving. In this work the artists express their resilience and strength as women.

Tony Albert

Tony Albert
Artwork: Ashes to Ashes, 7 artworks
Medium: Etching on paper
About the work: Formed into the shape of a crucifix, Albert presents 7 etchings produced with Cicada Press. Ashes to ashes not only pays tribute to Indigenous lives lost at the 1816 Appin Massacre but it also prompts the audience, in a reconciliatory manner, to contemplate and question historical mistruths.

Vincent Namatjira

Vincent Namatjira
Artwork: The Queen and Prince Phillip Attend the Exhibition
Medium: Synthetic polymer paint on canvas
About the work: I thought I would paint the Queen and her husband together attending the exhibition, looking at the all the Indigenous artworks on display. They are a bit nervous and excited at seeing so many great paintings, so they are reaching out to hold hands.

Watarru Collaborative

Watarru Collaborative
Artwork: Watarru
Medium: Synthetic polymer paint on linen
About the work: Puli tjuta munu kapi tjukula (there are rocky hills and water holes). Ngayuku ngura Watarru (this is my home Watarru). There are travelling lines between the rockholes where in the early days Anangu (Aboriginal) people would travel on foot.

Wawiriya Burton

Wawiriya Burton
Artwork: Ngayuku Mamaku Ngura (My father’s Country)
Medium: Synthetic polymer paint on linen
About the work: Wawiriya Burton is a senior woman of law in the region. She is a Ngangkari (traditional healer) and is a revered caretaker of Anangu (Aboriginal) law and culture. Here, Burton tells the story of her father’s Country near Piplatjatjara, west of Amata.

William Nyaparu Gardiner

William Nyaparu Gardiner
Artwork: Starting the 1946 Strike
Medium: Synthetic polymer paint on canvas
About the work: In the painting we have Don McLeod, Dooley Bin Bin, Jacob Oberdoo and Clancy McKenna (lower right) on the Marble Bar side, near Brockman River. These are the fellas that organised the strike to get a fair pay for our people.

Winnie Sampi

Winnie Sampi
Artwork: Surrounding Pannawonica Country
Medium: Synthetic polymer paint on canvas
About the work: You can’t see this kind of thing, the hill, from the road. All this Country here, there’s no mining, no nothing, it’s the land of a cattle station. I got my first job around that Country. Every day the Country is there, it’s never out of your sight.

Witjiti George

Witjiti George
Artwork: Wanampi Tjukurpa
Medium: Acrylic on Linen
About the work: Piltati is a well-known Tjukurpa (Dreamtime) story of the two Watis, two brothers and two water snakes at the Pultarti rockhole. The two women had gone to find mai (food). They were gone a long time and the men were hungry. They all live there in this rockhole. This is George’s mother’s Country near Kanypi on the APY Lands.

Wukun Wanambi

Wukun Wanambi
Artwork: Three Rocks
Medium: Natural earth pigments on wood
About the work: This installation refers to three sacred rocks which stand in the mouth of Trial Bay. Each one is a sacred and solitary rock. A white dome in the Bay, a round lump of granite, its top coloured white by roosting birds.

Yaritji Young

Yaritji Young
Artwork: Tjala Tjukurpa - Honey Ant Story
Medium: Synthetic polymer paint on linen
About the work: Young is telling the story of the Tjala or Honey ants which are found about a metre underground beneath Mulga trees. The Honey ant tunnels that lead down to the ant’s nests are called nyinantu. The Honey ant larvae are called ipilyka-ipilyka. Honey ants are a highly favoured food source.

Yinarupa Nangala

Yinarupa Nangala
Artwork: Womens Ceremonies at Mukula
Medium: Synthetic polymer paint on linen
About the work: This painting depicts designs associated with the rockhole site of Mukula, east of Jupiter Well in Western Australia. A large group of women came from the west and stopped at this site to perform the ceremonies associated with the area before continuing their travels towards the east.